Tag Archives: Floyd Mayweather Jr.

FNU Combat Sports Show: Is UFC Using Boxing as a Lifeline; CM Punk vs. Floyd?; Event Recaps and Previews

This week, Tom, Tony and Rich start our weekly broadcast with a discussion on the latest news on Floyd Mayweather Jr. teasing the idea of fighting in the cage. Even though Rich has been talking about this match-up on our show for weeks now, a recent article described the idea of CM Punk facing Mayweather as a rumor started by the
“Money Team.” Either Mayweather’s listening to our show or great minds think alike. We also touch on the subject of why the UFC may need to diversify with the addition of boxing cards and special events. We also recap last week’s boxing action and a spectacular UFC 221 card headlined by Yoel Romero’s TKO of Luke Rockhold. We then look forward to Roy Nelson’s fight with Matt Mitrione, set to go down later tonight on the Paramount Network. Finally, we preview UFC Fight Night 126, with a main event of Donald “Cowboy” Cerrone facing Yancy Medeiros.

Listen to the show below:

 

Richard “Popeye The Sailor Man” Rivera Finishes off Kevin Cobbs in 3 with super uppercut

“NEW ENGLAND’S FUTURE 5”
OFFICIAL RESULTS
(pictures courtesy of Bonesprostudios)
WORCESTER, Mass. (February 11, 2018) – Undefeated prospect Richard  “Popeye The Sailor Man”  Rivera  finished off Kevin “The New England Bully” Cobbs in the third round, punctuating the night with an lethal uppercut that landed right on the button, headlining last night’s “New England’s Future 5” card, presented by Rivera Promotions Entertainment, at The Palladium in Worcester, Massachusetts.

The 27-year-old Rivera (6-0, 5 KOs) fought once again in front of his large, traveling fanbase from Hartford, CT, capturing the vacant Universal Boxing Federation (UBF) light heavyweight title in dramatic fashion. The charismatic Hartford boxer ended his third consecutive match with what has become his trademark right-uppercut.

Rivera used his strength, energy and determined will to defeat South Boston’s Cobbs (10-3, 4 KOs), whose previous fight had been more than a year ago, when he was stopped in the second round by now world champion David Benavidez.

In only his sixth pro fight, the key question going into the bout was whether Rivera was ready to effectively step up in class to face a more experienced Cobbs. Right from the opening bell, the answer was a resounding, yes, as Rivera pounded Cobbs with powerful shots to the body and head.

Cobbs was dropped three times in the third round, one was ruled a push, and the end came when referee Jackie Morrell halted the action at the 2:51 as a reeling Cobbs was blasted backwards from the Rivera’s previously mentioned uppercut.

  The beginning of the end for Cobbs (L) as Rivera sets up his vaunted uppercut

“I stepped things up in the third,” Rivera explained. “He stopped throwing as many punches in the third and was ducking in. I said I wasn’t going to look for the knockout but, if it came, I’d take it. I got him with my uppercut. I respect Cobbs and thank him for giving me this opportunity.”
In the co-featured event, hometown favorite Bobby “BH3” Harris, III (2-0-1), the two-time national amateur champion, and Brazilian super middleweight Saul Almeida (0-8-2) fought to a four-round majority draw.
Super middleweight Troy “Omar KO Artist” Artis (5-7-1, 3 KOs), of Danbury, CT, upset intrastate rival Jose “Rated R” Rivera (4-2, 3 KOs), of Hartford, winning a six-round majority decision.
Danbury, CT junior welterweight Omar Bordoy, Jr. (4-0-, 1 KO) used a blistering body attack to defeat Seth Basler (0-5) by way of a lop-sided four-round unanimous decision.

Junior welterweight prospect Wilfredo “El Sucaro” Pagan (4-0, 2 KOs) floored veteran Bryan “The Brick” Abraham (6-29-2, 6 KOs) with a sweet right-left combination at the end of the opening round. In the second round, Pagan, of Southbridge, MA., drilled Abraham who went flying across the ring and into the ropes as referee Jackie Morrell halted the bout.

Springfield, MA junior middleweight Derrick “Bad Boy” Whitley (3-0) cruised to a dominating four-round unanimous decision over Cleveland’s Roger Blankenship (1-3), pitching a complete shutout in the process.

Bridgeport, CT welterweight Joe Goss (1-0) turned in an impressive pro debut, dropping Montreal’s Samuel Vasquez (1-3, 1 KO) in the second round on his way to a four-round unanimous decision.

Puerto Rican junior lightweight Luis “Lobito” Rivera (4-3, 1 KOs) overcame a nasty cut over his eye to win a hard-fought four-round majority decision over Carlos Marrero, III (0-2), of Bridgeport, CT, in a non-stop action fight to the finish.

Unbeaten Springfield, MA light heavyweight Ray “Bazooka” Graceski (5-0-1, 3 KOs) and International Muay Thai fighter, Harford’s pro boxing debuting Pawel Banasiak (0-1-0), fought to a four-round draw in an entertaining brawl.

Puerto Rican super middleweight Jelame Garcia (7-0, 6 KOs), fighting out of Lynn, MA., remained undefeated but Nathan Schulte (0-5), of Woburn, MA, extended him the full distance for first time as a pro en route to a four-round unanimous decision.

Complete results:

OFFICIAL RESULTS
MAIN EVENT
VACANT UBF NEW ENGLAND LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP
Richard Rivera (6-0, 5 KOs), Hartford, CT
WKO3 (2:51)
Kevin Cobbs (10-3, 4 KOs), South Boston, MA
(Rivera won vacant UBF New England light heavyweight title)
CO-FEATURE – SUPER MIDDLEWEIGHTS
Bobby Harris, III (2-0-1), Worcester, MA
D6 (37-39, 38-38)
Saul Almeida (0-8-2), Framingham, MA
LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHTS
Ray Graceski (5-0-1, 3 KOs), Springfield, MA
D4 (38-38, 38-38, 38-38)
Pawel Banasiak (0-0-1), Hartford, CT
SUPER MIDDLEWEIGHTS
Troy Artis (5-7-1, 3 KOs), Danbury, CT
WDEC6 (58-56, 58-56, 57-57)
Jose Rivera (4-2, 3 KOs), Hartford, CT
SUPER MIDDLEWEIGHTS
Jelame Garcia (7-0, 6 KOs), Lynn, MA
WDEC4 (40-36, 40-36, 39-37)
Nathan Schulte (0-5), Woburn, MA
JUNIOR MIDDLEWEIGHTS
Derrick Whitley (3-0), Springfield, MA
WDEC4 (40-35, 40-36, 40-36)
Robert Blankenship (1-3), Cleveland, OH
Joseph Goss (1-0), Bridgeport, CT
WDEC4 (40-35, 39,36, 38-37)
Samuel Vasquez (1-3, 1 KO), Montreal, Canada
JUNIOR WELTERWEIGHTS
Omar Bordoy, Jr. (4-0, 1 KO), Danbury, CT
WDEC4 (40-36, 40-36, 40-36)
Seth Basler (0-5), Marion, IL
Wilfredo Pagan (4-0, 2 KOs), Southbridge, MA
WTKO2 (1:25)
Bryan Abraham (6-29-2, 6 KOs), Schenectady, NY
JUNIOR LIGHTWEIGHTS
Luis Rivera (4-3, 1 KO), Hartford, CT
WDEC4 (40-36, 39-37, 38-38)
Carlos Marrera, III (0-2), Bridgeport, CT
 
INFORMATION:
Facebook.com/RiveraPromotionsEntertainment
Twitter: @RiveraPromoEnt @joseriverachamp, KingRivera_

Undefeated N.E. prospect Omar Bordoy, Jr. Prepared to make statement at “New England’s Future 5”

“New England’s Future 5”
Feb. 10 in Worcester, MA

WORCESTER, Mass. (January 24, 2018) – One of New England’s leading pro prospects, junior welterweight Omar Bordoy, Jr., has prepared to make a statement February 10th at “New England’s Future 5”, presented Rivera Promotions Entertainment (RPE), at The Palladium in Worcester.
Fighting out of Danbury, Connecticut, Bordoy (3-0, 1 KO) faces Puerto Rican-born opponent, Alexander “El Bravo” Picot (2-4-1), in a four-round bout. “My opponent is tough, and he always comes to fight,” Bordoy said. “He keeps coming forward and that’s going to make for an exciting fight.”
The 22-year-old Bordoy is the typical example of a volatile teenager who found his way in boxing. He was a high school football player who started boxing at the age of 17. Bordoy had an abbreviated amateur career, highlighted by his winning performance at the New England Golden Gloves as a novice boxer.
“I was a bad hot head as a kid,” Bordoy admitted. “One day, my cousin Edgardo, invited me to his gym after football practice and he beat me up. I was knocked down a few notches. I got into boxing and enjoyed watching Miguel Cotto and Mike Tyson. I even have some of Cotto’s tattoos. Now, I’m more of a boxer, like a Pernell Whitaker or Floyd Mayweather, Jr. I’m a come- forward boxer who can still brawl. I’m working on my defense and feel that making adjustments in the ring is what I do best.”
Bordoy, Jr. credits Team Bordoy — manager A.J. Galante, head trainer Bennie Little, cut-man Luis Marichal, strength-and-conditioning coach Chris Mulfalmi and Dave McDonough – for his success.
“I’m pleased to be with the right people to bring me to the top and I’m willing to do what’s needed to get there,” Bordoy added.
Bordoy, who works fulltime as a repair technician, made his pro debut last May and he fought a total of three times in 2017, his most recent last October in Worcester on an RPE-promoted show, in which he stopped 34-fight veteran Bryan Abraham in the fourth round.
“We enjoy working with Team Bordoy,” promoter Jose Antonio Rivera remarked. “I am proud of Omar and his accomplishments so far. He is a young, throwback fighter with a lot of potential. I see big things in his future and I am glad to see he is being guided in the right direction by his team.”
In the eight-round main event, undefeated Hartford (CT) light heavyweight Richard “Popeye The Sailor Man” Rivera (5-0, 4 KOs) takes on Kevin “The New England Bully” Cobbs (10-2, 4 KOs), fighting out of South Boston (MA), for the vacant Universal Boxing Federation (UBF) New England title in the eight-round main event.
Worcester’s two-time national amateur champion Bobby “BH3” Harris, III (2-0) faces Brazilian super middleweight Saul Almeida (0-8-1) in the four-round co-featured event. Hartford super middleweight Jose “Rated R” Rivera (4-1, 3 KOs) meets Troy “Omar KO Artist” Artis (4-7-1 (3 KOs), of Danbury (CT) in a six-round bout.
Fighting on the undercard, all in four-round matches, are Southbridge (MA) junior welterweight Wilfredo “El Sucaro” Pagan (3-0, 1 KO) vs. pro-debuting Nick Peralta, of Lawrence, undefeated Springfield (MA) light heavyweight Ray “Bazooka” Graceski(5-0, 3 KOs). vs. Hartford’s pro-debuting Pawel Bansiak, Springfield welterweightDerrick “Bad Boy” Whitley (2-0) vs. Roger Blankenship (1-2), undefeated Puerto Rican super middleweight Jelame Garcia (6-0, 6 KOs) vs. Brazilian Rodrigo Almeida 1-7), Bridgeport’s (CT) pro-debuting welterweight Joseph Goss vs. Seth Basler (0-3), and Hartford junior lightweight vs. Bridgeport’s Carlos Marraro, III (0-1).
All fights and fighters are subject to change.
Tickets, priced at $75.00 (ringside) and $45.00 (general admission), are on sale and available to purchase at www.ThePalladium.net or the Palladium box office (general admission only), or by contacting Jose Rivera (elgallojar@gmail.com/508.864.6954), AJ Rivera (anthoneerivera@gmail.com/774.272.2269) or any of the fighters.
Doors open at 6 p.m. ET, first bout 7 p.m. ET.
Part of the proceeds will be donated to the Luis Rosa, Jr. Scholarship Fund.
Sponsors include Lundgren Honda, Top Royalty, Allstate, USANA, Atty. Maria M. Rivera-Cotto, Ambicion Musik, Hill Team Associates and Lundren Insurance & Financial Services.
INFORMATION:
Facebook.com/RiveraPromotionsEntertainment
Twitter: @RiveraPromoEnt @joseriverachamp @KingRivera_

FNU Combat Sports Show: Holm vs. Cyborg Recap, Stephenson v. Ho Choi Preview, Can UFC Boxing Work: Look Ahead to 2018

This FNU Combat Sports Show covers a wide range of important topics and events. We recap Holly Holm’s brutal battle with Cris Justino at UFC 219 and look forward to a great Fight Night 124 card on the 14th.

We report on Mike Tyson’s new Pot Ranch in California, Big John McCarthy Joining the Bellator Analyst Crew, Vinny Paz getting wrapped up in assault charges, and Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor 2 chances.

Tony discusses the upcoming boxing schedule and we also get off topic and talk some football and basketball. Tony even updates us on the Canelo vs. GGG rematch negotiations.

 

Listen here:

FNU Combat Sports Show: Quitters Never Win

This broadcast of the FNU Combat Sports Show starts off with one of the most controversial stories of the week. Many sports pundits are quick to ridicule Guillermo Rigondeaux for bowing out of his blockbuster boxing match with Vasyl Lomachenko last Saturday. ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith wasted no time during the broadcast, ripping into the Cuban boxer for refusing to come out for the seventh round of the one-sided fight. Teddy Atlas, exiled from his ringside reporting duties thanks to his outspoken views on boxing corruption and his abrasive treatment of lesser-experienced commentators, came to Rigo’s defense. Atlas argued with Smith from his own home studio, basically explaining that everyone is human. Tom, Tony and Rich all offer their own takes on the situation and their thoughts on the “fight.”

We also track the latest news in combat sports, recap the past week’s events and preview competing UFC and Bellator events this Saturday.  We even touch on the multiple story lines involving Floyd Mayweather Jr. that are making the rounds in the sports media this week.  “Money” claims he can make up to a billion dollars if he goes into the UFC for a three or four fight deal. Well, good luck, Floyd. I hear CM Punk wants another fight.

Listen to the two part broadcast below.

 

Part 1:

 

Part 2:

SHOWTIME Sports Confirms Aug. 26 SHOWTIME PPV® Presentation Of Mayweather vs. McGregor Second Biggest Pay-Per-View Of All Time

 

Photo Credit: Esther Lin/SHOWTIME

 

SHOWTIME SPORTS confirmed today that the SHOWTIME PPV presentation of Mayweather vs. McGregor on August 26, 2017 generated 4.3 million pay-per-view buys in North America. This includes traditional television distribution and online portals such as the new SHOWTIME PPV app and SHOWTIMEPPV.com as well as UFC.TV in U.S. and Canada.

 

Mayweather vs. McGregor, a four-fight SHOWTIME PPV boxing event at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas, officially stands as the second largest pay-per-view event of all time behind Mayweather vs. Pacquiao, which set the North American pay-per-view mark at 4.6 million buys in 2015. The SHOWTIME PPV totals for Mayweather vs. McGregor far exceed the now third best event in history—nearly doubling the 2.48 million buys for Oscar De La Hoya vs. Mayweather in 2007. 

 

The total global revenue from the event including ticket sales, sponsorship and international distribution exceeds $600 million, which—along with Mayweather vs. Pacquiao— is among the largest for a single-day sporting event of all time. Mayweather and SHOWTIME PPV now account for the three highest grossing pay-per-view events in television history with the third-ranked event Mayweather vs. Canelo from 2013.

FNU Combat Sports Show: Post-Fight Reaction to May/Mac, UFC Fight Night Preview, Sign Tony’s Petition to Throw out First Pitch at a Phillies Game

This week’s combat sports show covers a wide range of topics. Tom, Tony and Rich discuss the dud of a boxing match that proved McGregor needed about six more months of “proper fookin” training to be more competitive in.  Mayweather cruises to 50-0, but Rich questions if that really eclipses the true 50-0 circumstances that would have made Rocky’s unbeaten streak more impressive. After all, Mayweather did not possess an active title belt at the time of the win and the “Money Belt” shouldn’t count as a true championship he was defending. Rocky retired undefeated, owning the belt at 49-0. To eclipse Rocky’s record Floyd would need to have a world title belt or multiple belts at the time of his 50th win being recorded.  We also discuss everything else going on in the combat sports world, except Ronda Rousey and Travis Browne getting married.

 

 

PART TWO

MAYWEATHER vs. McGREGOR TO PREMIERE ON SHOWTIME® THIS SATURDAY IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED BY ALL ACCESS: MAYWEATHER vs. McGREGOR EPILOGUE

 

Networks’ Emmy Award-Winning ALL ACCESS Epilogue Takes Viewers Behind The Scenes Of The Blockbuster Event & Floyd Mayweather’s Final Fight

 

Photo Credit: Esther Lin/SHOWTIME

 

The unprecedented Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor blockbuster, the final fight of Mayweather’s illustrious career, will premiere on SHOWTIME this Saturday, Sept. 2 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.  The showdown between the future Hall of Famer and the UFC superstar originally aired live on SHOWTIME PPV® on Saturday, August 26 at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.  Saturday’s SHOWTIME premiere of the main event will include the singing of the national anthems of the United States and Ireland by Grammy® nominated and multi-platinum artist Demi Lovato and Irish recording sensation Imelda May.

 

The SHOWTIME presentation of the exciting fight will be immediately followed by the premiere of ALL ACCESS: Mayweather vs. McGregor Epilogue.  The network’s’ distinctive Epilogue reveals the drama of fight night from a unique perspective and introduces viewers to the rarely seen aftermath of world championship prizefighting.  ALL ACCESS: Mayweather vs. McGregor Epilogue goes behind the scenes into the locker rooms, corners and inner circles as McGregor aimed to shock the world in his boxing debut and Mayweather exited the ring for the final time.

FLOYD MAYWEATHER SCORES 10th ROUND TECHNICAL KNOCKOUT WIN OVER UFC STAR CONOR McGREGOR ON SHOWTIME PPV® FROM T-MOBILE ARENA IN LAS VEGAS

Gervonta Davis, Badou Jack and Andrew Tabiti All Record Victories In Four-Fight SHOWTIME PPV Event
 
Delayed Telecast of Tonight’s Main Event Will Air Exclusively on SHOWTIME® on Saturday, September 2 
at 9 p.m. ET/PT
Click HERE for Photos from Esther Lin/SHOWTIME
 
Click HERE for Photos from Idris Erba/Mayweather Promotions
LAS VEGAS (Aug. 27, 2017) – Future Boxing Hall of Famer Floyd “Money” Mayweather ended his historic career in style on Saturday night with a convincing 10th-round technical knockout victory over UFC mega-star Conor McGregor in the main event of a four-fight SHOWTIME PPV event from T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.
The 40-year-old Mayweather, fighting for the first time in 714 days, announced after the fight that he will never fight again, ending his 21-year career in style by controlling an all-action fight that thrilled the 14,623 fans in attendance and watching around the world. With Mayweather coming forward just like he promised, referee Robert Byrd stopped the super welterweight fight at 1:05 of the 10th round as Mayweather punished McGregor with a series of blows that staggered his weary opponent.
With the win, the five-division world champion from Las Vegas becomes the first boxer to finish his career at 50-0, eclipsing the record he had previously shared with the legendary Rocky Marciano.
“I think we gave the fans what they wanted to see,” Mayweather told SHOWTIME ringside reporter Jim Gray after the fight. “I owed them for the Pacquiao fight. I had to come straight ahead and give the fans a show. That’s what I gave them.”
All three judges – Dave Moretti (87-83), Burt Clements (89-82) and Guido Cavalleri (89-81) – had Mayweather ahead on the scorecards at the time of the stoppage. SHOWTIME’s unofficial scorer Steve Farhood had Mayweather ahead by the score of 86-85.
The first two-division champion in UFC history, McGregor, from Dublin, Ireland, said he was fatigued as the fight got into the later stages. “He’s composed, he’s not that fast, he’s not that powerful, but boy is he composed in there,” the 29-year-old McGregor said. “I thought it was close though and I thought it was a bit of an early stoppage. He was just a lot more composed with his shots. I have to give it to him, that’s what 50 pro fights will do for you.”
Both fighters had their moments in the early rounds. In the fourth round, Mayweather forced McGregor to back-pedal and continued to force the action.
At the midway point of the fight, Farhood had given the first three rounds to the more aggressive McGregor, but then rounds four, five and six to the more accurate Mayweather.
“Our game plan was to take our time, go to him, let him shoot his shots early and then take him out down the stretch,” Mayweather said. “We know in MMA he fights for 25 minutes. After 25 minutes, he started to slow down. I guaranteed to everybody that this wouldn’t go the distance.
“Our game plan was to go straight ahead. I said numerous times that I wouldn’t back down and that’s what I did.”
McGregor said he would consider boxing again, and would also return to fight in the UFC. “I’ve been strangled on live TV and came back,” he said. “When you’re in here in the squared circle, everything is different. Let the man put me down, that’s fatigue, that’s not damage.
“Where was the final two rounds? Let me walk back to my corner and compose myself.”
Mayweather was lethally accurate in the final round, landing 20 of 26 power punches before the referee stopped the fight. McGregor had a 51-40 advantage in punches landed over the first five rounds but was out-landed 130 to 60 in rounds six through 10 as Mayweather put an exclamation point on the final fight of his career.
“Rocky Marciano is a legend and I look forward to going into the Hall of Fame one day,” said Mayweather. “This was my last fight tonight. For sure. Tonight was my last fight. Tonight I chose the right dance partner to dance with. Conor, you are a hell of a champion.”
In the co-main event, undefeated rising star Gervonta “Tank” Davis defeated unbeaten challenger Francisco Fonseca via a controversial eighth-round knockout 39 seconds into the round.
The 22-year-old Davis (19-0, 18 KOs) landed a series of clean blows before an apparent shot to the back of the head sent Fonseca down. Referee Russell Mora gave the 10-count allowing Davis to earn his 18th stoppage win in 19 professional fights. The fight was originally scheduled to be Davis’ second defense of his IBF Junior Lightweight World Championship, but Davis failed to make weight on Friday, coming two pounds over the 130-pound limit that Fonseca (19-1-1, 13 KOs) weighed-in at.
“I threw the shot as he put his head down,” said Davis. “I was definitely going to stop him eventually. He was in trouble before the last shot.”
Davis continued, “I’m going to stay at 130 pounds and try to get my title back. I still want to unify the junior lightweight division.”
Fonseca said he was sent to the canvas with an illegal blow.
“Everybody saw that when I was going down, he hit me twice behind,” Fonseca said. “It’s a blow that’s not legal. It was here in Las Vegas, so he had the crowd going for him, and I just want a rematch. He never hurt me with that exchange. Even though he came in at 160 pounds today, he doesn’t hit as hard as they say he hits.”
Former super middleweight champion Badou Jack became a two-division world champion with a TKO win over Nathan Cleverly to capture the WBA Light Heavyweight World Championship.
The Las Vegas-based, Swedish-born Jack (21-1-3, 13 KOs) out-classed Cleverly (30-4, 16 KOs) in a one-sided bout that was stopped by referee Tony Weeks with 12 seconds remaining in the fifth round. It was the first fight for Jack since moving up from 168 pounds to 175 pounds.
Jack had recorded majority draws in each of his past two fights against James DeGale of England and Canada’s Lucian Bute.
“It’s a dream come true,” said the 33-year-old Jack. “I’ve learned that you can’t leave it in the hands of the judges.”
“Jack was very strong,” said Cleverly. “He caught me and broke my nose in the third round. It was a downward spiral from there. I was wounded and protecting myself. It’s horrible but part of the sport.”
Jim Gray asked Jack who he would like to fight next, Andre Ward or Adonis Stevenson? “I think Adonis Stevenson, let’s get it on. I’ll go to Canada. I’ll go anywhere.”
“I got a little excited at times but I barely got hit,” Jack said. “My boxing IQ was the difference in this fight. Everybody doubting me motivated me. My trainer and my team did a great job getting me to this point.”
The PPV telecast began with unbeaten Andrew Tabiti and former world champion Steve Cunningham meeting in a 10-round cruiserweight battle. Tabiti (16-0, 13 KOs) controlled the action against the 41-year-old Cunningham (29-9-1, 13 KOs) on his way to a unanimous decision scored 97-93 twice and 100-90.
With Floyd Mayweather Sr. working in his corner, the 27-year-old Tabiti set the tempo early and set the pace for the entire fight. “I was just jabbing him and making sure I stayed smart,” Tabiti said. “He’s a veteran so I had to stay composed. I wanted to show that I could box. This was a step up for me and I felt comfortable in there.”
A Chicago native who lives and trains in Las Vegas, Tabiti landed 31 percent of his jabs (70 of 229) and 49 percent of his power punches compared to just 27 percent for Cunningham. With the win, Tabiti retains the NABF cruiserweight title and won the USBA cruiserweight championship.
“He had a decent jab but he wasn’t busy enough,” Tabiti added. “I just didn’t want to make mistakes. If you start too fast against a veteran you’re liable to get caught by him.”
Cunningham wasn’t impressed with Tabiti. “I don’t think Andrew Tabiti is a championship level fighter,” he said. “I thought I won the fight. I didn’t think I saw anything special from him.”
#          #          #
MAYWEATHER vs. McGREGOR
Floyd Mayweather vs. Conor McGregor was a 12-round super welterweight matchup that pitted the legendary boxer Mayweather against the all-time MMA great McGregor in the main event of an unprecedented four-fight pay-per-view boxing event.  Mayweather vs. McGregor took place Saturday, Aug. 26 at 9 p.m. ET/6 p.m. PT at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.  The event was produced and distributed live by SHOWTIME PPV, promoted by Mayweather Promotions and sponsored by Corona.

Yordenis Ugas Earns Decision Over Thomas Dulorme in Action-Packed Welterweight Bout Featured on Mayweather vs. McGregor Prelims on FOX & FOX Deportes Saturday Night from T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas

 
Juan Heraldez Recovers From Knockdown to Win Decision Over Jose Miguel Borrego in Battle of Unbeaten Prospects
 
Click HERE for Photos from Idris Erba/Mayweather Promotions
 
LAS VEGAS (August 26, 2017) – Welterweight contender Yordenis Ugas (20-3, 9 KOs) took home a unanimous decision victory over Thomas Dulorme (24-3, 16 KOs) despite being knocked down in Mayweather vs. McGregor preliminary action presented by Mayweather Promotions on FOX and FOX Deportes Saturday night from T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.
Both men looked to establish their jab in round one but in round two Ugas landed a big uppercut that stunned Dulorme and forced him to take a knee. Dulorme rose to his feet and tried to fire back but was hit with a right hand that put him down for the second time in the round.
“It was a great fight,” said Ugas. “I knew that Dulorme had a great camp preparing for Shawn Porter so when I knocked him down I figured he would get up. I only had nine days to prepare for this fight so I had to be smart and not waste anything.”
“It was a good fight,” said Dulorme. “It was a very tough fight. I came to fight and I took him seriously. I kept working. It was up and down but I kept working.
The bout was defined by good back and forth action with both men having their moments in control. Dulorme was committed to attacking the body to slow Ugas but was given a warning for low blows in the fifth round. Dulorme continued to test the body however and strayed too low early in the seventh round, forcing referee Vic Drakulich to deduct a point.
The deduction seemed to light a fire under Dulorme who pushed forward and began to break through the defense of Ugas. An uppercut temporarily stunned Ugas midway through the round and Dulorme followed up shortly after with a left hook that put Ugas on the canvas.
“When I got knocked down I knew I had to get up and show heart and guts,” said Ugas. “That was the only way to do it.”
The momentum of the fight continued to swing heading into the final round when Dulorme again delivered a low blow that forced the referee to deduct a point early in the frame. Both men pressed forward for the final minutes of the fight looking to score another decisive blow but after 10 rounds the fight was left up to the judges.
“I thought the referee lost the fight for me,” said Dulorme. “I didn’t agree with him. I didn’t think I was throwing low blows. I thought it was clean. I thought he was tired late in the fight so I tried to increase the pressure. But it was hard because the referee didn’t let me work on the inside like I wanted to.”
“I got a little tired at the end and should have closed the show,” said Ugas. “But that happens with short notice fights. I just have to keep getting better.”
All three judges saw the bout in favor of Ugas by scores of 94-91 and 93-92 twice.
“I’m going to get back in camp and keep learning,” said Dulorme. “I’m not happy, but I’m going to keep learning. I got off the floor today and kept fighting and I’ll keep doing that in my career.”
The opening bout of the telecast saw Juan Heraldez (13-0, 8 KOs) box his way to a unanimous decision over Jose Miguel Borrego (12-1, 11 KOs) in their 10-round welterweight fight.
“I was very prepared and I took advantage of this opportunity,” said Heraldez. “I executed my plan and came out with a clear victory. Other than the knockdown, I thought that I outboxed him every other round. “The jab was really the key tonight. I dictated everything off of the jab and tried to use my angles, my footwork and my movement. I did what I wanted to do.”
Heraldez controlled the ring for much of the fight with his jab and movement on the outside, while Borrego appeared focused on delivering power shots and a knockout. Heraldez controlled the pace in the first few rounds, landing scoring combinations before darting out of the way and avoiding Borrego’s return fire.
“Heraldez ran the whole fight,” said Borrego. “I’m happy that the fans booed the decision because they know he ran. I came to entertain the fans and that’s what I did.”
The 19-year-old Borrego was content to cover up and duck low while trying to navigate through Heraldez’s jab, but was unable to land enough left hooks to win early rounds in the fight. He had his first moment at the very end of the sixth when a looping left hook connected clean with Heraldez and appeared to stun him right before the bell ended the round.
Borrego continued to attack aggressively as he chased Heraldez with big power punches. In round nine Borrego connected cleanly with a left hook that put Heraldez on the mat midway through the round.
“I let myself get distracted and that’s why I got knocked down,” said Heraldez. I got a little ahead of myself. I’m the only person who can stop myself.
Despite Borrego’s continued aggression, Heraldez was able to hold on and survive the round without much further damage.
“I have to cut the ring off better,” said Borrego. “I also need to let my hands go more and throw three or four punch combinations instead of just one or two at a time.”
The final round saw Heraldez return to using his movement as he was able to avoid the charging Borrego for the last three minutes. After 10 rounds, all three judges scored the bout in favor of Heraldez by scores of 96-93 and 97-92 twice.
“It feels great to be on this stage and it’s moments like these where I can go out and compete and I can prove everyone right who gave me this chance,” said Heraldez. “This was a prospect fight and now I’m on to bigger and better things. I’m ready to take the next step.”
#          #          #
For more information: visit http://www.foxsports.com/presspass/homepagewww.foxdeportes.com and www.t-mobilearena.com. Follow on Twitter @MayweatherPromo, @FOXSports, @FOXDeportes and @Swanson_Comm and become a fan on Facebook at www.facebook.com/foxsports, www.facebook.com/foxdeportesand www.facebook.com/MayweatherPromotions.